Does this sound like you?

Adults with ADD often have difficulty staying focused on daily tasks, becoming easily distracted by sights, sounds and thoughts.  They can find themselves late to events and meetings, losing things on a daily or hourly basis.

Students with ADD have more obstacles to overcome at home, at school and with their peers. Their raw intelligence does not usually match their performance in school.  The result is frustration and anger. At home, they struggle to internalize and comply with household rules, creating friction with the family.

For people with ADD, their brain works differently than others—it’s a neurological issue. Oftentimes they are not purposely acting out, rather they lack the ability to control certain reactions like impulsivity, hyperactivity, lack of focus and overblown emotions. ADD is complicated and looks differently in everyone.

Many individuals will find ways to self-medicate to overcome these difficulties with large amounts of caffeine to stay stimulated or drugs/alcohol to mask feelings of inadequacy, frustration and depression.

Approximately 11% of children 4-17 years of age (6.4 million) are diagnosed with ADD each year.




60% of children with ADD in the U.S. become adults with ADD, about 8 million adults.


Males are almost three times more likely to be diagnosed with ADD than females.


50% of adults with ADD also struggle with an anxiety disorder.

Related Diagnoses

ADD is often misdiagnosed or exists alongside other disorders, making it challenging to treat effectively. You may have struggled in the past with:

  • OCD
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Anger Management
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